Betsy Hines Realtors, LLC | Marshfield Real Estate, Scituate Real Estate, Duxbury Real Estate


This Single-Family in Marshfield, MA recently sold for $605,000. This Cape,Antique style home was sold by Office Marshfield - Betsy Hines Realtors, LLC.


24 Bow Street, Marshfield, MA 02050

Marshfield Hills

Single-Family

$689,900
Price
$605,000
Sale Price

9
Rooms
4
Beds
2/1
Full/Half Baths
No Showings thru Holidays.This lovely pristine antique cape circa 1814 is located in the heart of the Marshfield Hills village area. It's 2.25 acres include a park like level grassy area w room for tennis court, soccer field, corral, or gardens. The property includes a pool house, detached 2 car garage and a nice barn by the back field. A large glassed sun-room off the kitchen area has a beautiful brick floor enhanced by a wooden ceiling & soffit lighting. This attractive room overlooks the pool and back acreage scenery. Beautiful wide pine floors are throughout. Kitchen is an open plan next to the family room. There are nice high ceilings on the first floor. Beautiful brick walkways for every direction. 4 charming fireplaces. There are lots of convenient closets, nooks and crannies throughout this house. Walk to post office, general store, art center and small library. Short ride to train, Scituate Harbor, shopping, beaches and marinas. Location, Location plus charm and character.

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If you recently bought or sold a house, you may have only a short amount of time to pack up your belongings and get your family ready for moving day. As such, you'll need to tell your children about your upcoming move to ensure they can prepare accordingly.

Ultimately, informing your kids about your move can be difficult, especially for families that have lived in a particular city or town for many years. Lucky for you, we're here to help you minimize the stress commonly associated with telling your kids about moving day.

Here are three tips to ensure you can stay calm, cool and composed when you inform your kids about your decision to relocate.

1. Speak with Your Kids As Soon As Possible

The longer that you wait to tell your kids about your move, the tougher it will become to break the news to them. Thus, as soon as you decide to purchase or sell a home, you should tell your kids.

Remember, the sooner you speak with your children, the sooner they can start planning for the future. You also can discuss any moving concerns with your kids and ensure they can receive your full emotional support as moving day approaches.

2. Plan Ahead for Your Family Discussion

In most instances, kids will have lots of questions about your decision to move. As a parent, it is your responsibility to dedicate the necessary time and resources to respond to all of your kids' queries.

Consider your children's perspective before you inform your kids about your decision to buy or sell a house – you'll be glad you did. If you plan ahead for a discussion with your kids, you may be able to anticipate potential questions and be ready to provide thoughtful responses.

3. Be Honest

No parent has all the answers, all the time. And if you face children's questions about your move and are uncertain about how to respond to them, you should not hesitate to speak from the heart.

It may be impossible to have answers to all of your kids' questions about an upcoming move. However, if you're honest with your children, you can provide them with plenty of support throughout the moving cycle.

When it comes to discussing an upcoming move with kids, both parents and their children may get emotional. Fortunately, parents and children can work together to support one another and ensure all family members can reap the benefits of a successful transition to a new address.

Lastly, if you need extra help as you get ready to discuss an upcoming move with your kids, you can always consult with a real estate agent. In addition to helping you navigate the homebuying or home selling process, a real estate agent can provide honest, unbiased recommendations about the best ways to inform your children about your decision to buy or sell a residence.

Use the aforementioned tips, and you can take the guesswork out of telling your kids about your upcoming move.


It goes without saying that buying a home is time-consuming.

 First, there’s the financial planning to determine when you’re ready to buy a home. Then you need to get pre-approved for a mortgage and start looking for homes. After viewing several homes you finally find the perfect home. Then comes the difficult process of making an offer and negotiating the cost of the home. If all goes well, your offer is accepted and you get to enter the lengthy mortgage closing process. However, your work is not yet done. You’ll have to move out of your current residence and into your new home. All of this while juggling your work and social life.

 After all of this, it might seem like the only thing left to do is relax in your new home. While it may be true that you certainly deserve a break, there are some things you should do sooner rather than later when you move into your new home.

 In this article, we’ll cover ten things you should do right away once you move into your new home.

1. Home security

Your chief consideration when moving into your new home should be making sure it’s safe. The best first step to take is to change all of the locks on your house. In spite of how trustworthy the previous homeowner may have seemed, you can never be 100% sure who had spare keys to their home. Changing locks is quick and inexpensive, especially considering what’s at stake.

Another important step in home security is to put new batteries in and test all smoke detectors, make sure fire extinguishers are up-to-date, and ensure air filters are cleaned.

2. Set up your utilities

One of the first things you have to do when moving into a new home is to call your utility companies and transfer services into your name. Make a list of the services you’ll need to set up (electricity, water, garbage removal, internet, home security, heating, etc.). This is also a good time to set up online accounts and autopay for these services. It will save you time each month and make it easier to keep track of your bills if you simplify this process from the get-go.

3. Self-inspection

You should have already had the home inspected by a professional prior to closing on the house. However, things can change in the time that someone moves all of their belongings out of a home and you move all of yours in. Wiring can be damaged, pipes banged, windows cracked, and so on. Do a thorough inspection of your home to check for leaks, broken wires, and fire hazards to be sure that your home is in good condition.

4. Deep clean

It might be tempting to just move your belongings into their new places once you arrive at your new home. However, the best time to clean a room is when it’s empty. Before you set up your furniture or fill your cabinets, give them a thorough cleaning.

5. Familiarize yourself with circuit breaker and water valves

When disaster strikes, you’ll want to be ready for it. Get to know your circuit box before the first power outage. Store flashlights in easily accessible places and make sure they have fresh batteries. Similarly, familiarize yourself with the main water shutoff valve in case you have a pipe burst. If the former homeowner lived alone and you have a large family, there’s a chance that the sudden surge in power and water usage could reveal issues with plumbing and wiring that the former owner wasn’t aware of.


Radon has no smell, taste, or color. It is a transparent, radioactive gas. Radon is released when the uranium that is contained in the soil and rocks decays over time. The reason that radon is an issue in a home is because it is released through cracks or openings that exist in the foundation. If too much radon is present in the home, the radioactive particles can attach themselves to dust particles, causing people in the home to breathe the harmful substance in.  


What Is A Radon Test?


The radon test is conducted over the course of two days. A testing machine or canisters are placed on the lowest habitable level of a home being tested. This would be either on the first floor or in the finished basement level of the home. The cost of a radon test isn’t very much, ranging anywhere from $65 to $125. The radon test is typically part of the home inspection, but sometimes other circumstances warrant a test or re-test. The canisters take a bit more time to produce results than the testing machines do, so confer with your inspector before the test is done.   


The Basics


One thing you should know is that radon is always present. The level of radon fluctuates constantly. The test is conducted over a two day period to get the average level of radon in the home. The Environmental Protection Agency considers levels of radon at or above 4 pCi/L to be unsafe. If this is found to be true, there is a solution, however, as systems that lessen the amount of radon in the home can be installed. These can come with a hefty price tag, costing anywhere from $1,000 and up.   


Radon Levels


Radon levels will vary on a daily basis. They can also vary by season, with weather conditions and with the amount of available ventilation. Structural changes that have been made to the home can also have an effect on the levels of radon in the home. If you are getting ready to sell your home and already have a radon mitigation system installed, you may want to test the levels before you even put your home on the market to know what you’re working with. The system may not be working properly, or the levels may have faced a sharp increase, making it hard for the removal system to keep up. 


 With the proper installation of a radon removal system, the air in your home will be safe to breathe. If you put an offer in on a home and the home inspection finds that there are unsafe levels of radon present, at least you’ll know what you’re dealing with. If you decide that the home is not the place for you and your family, even with a removal system, you’ll walk away from the deal informed. If you’re a seller, beware that the level of radon in your home could affect the sale. Although radon sounds like a scary thing, it’s manageable. Radon tests and removal systems help to keep the levels safe.


It’s always nice to have a roof over your head, as the old saying goes. Sometimes we don’t think about roof maintenance until it’s too late. Without the proper steps, a simple leak can turn into a big problem with your roof. Roofs can often fail resulting from simple natural wear and tear. Even if you have been doing regular maintenance on your roof, if replacing an old roof is delayed, bigger problems could happen in the future with the structure of your home. There are some warning signs that you should look out for so you know when your roof needs attention. Some signs that your roof may need to be replaced are: Shingles are Curled or Cupped When the edges of a shingle are curled up, it could cause water and debris to get under the shingle and into the roof. This will result in a weakened roof. “Bald” Spots On The Roof Appear If there’s parts of the roof where the granules are missing, it may be time for a new roof. These spots could cause leaks and even eventually cave in. Sometimes the fix could be as simple as changing a few shingles. Other times, the entire roof may need to be replaced. Cracked Shingles Appear Shingles are manufactured for durability. However, if your roof is not properly ventilated, or if debris is not cleared from the roof, it can impact the life of your roof, causing cracked shingles. Cracked shingles are an obvious sign that your roof needs attention. Moss Is Growing On The Roof If your roof doesn’t get much sunlight, moss can grow on the roof. More than a cosmetic issue, moss holds moisture on the roof’s surface. When this moss and held moisture freezes, this can cause damage to the shingles and the granules themselves. The problem with moss is that brushing it off won’t prevent it from growing again. A professional roofing contractor may need to be contacted in this case to get rid of the moss for good. Your Neighbors Are Having Their Roofs Replaced Neighborhoods are generally built around the same time. If your neighbors are beginning to have work done on their roofs, it’s a good bet that you might need some work done on your roof as well. Also, since neighbors’ homes will suffer the same conditions as your home, your roofs could be in similar conditions. Your Roof Has Dark Streaks Algae in the air cause streaks to form on roofs and decks. This is more of a cosmetic issue at first. These algae streaks can be removed using a 50:50 mix of water and bleach which can be sprayed directly on the roof. Don’t use a pressure washer. Instead use a low grade garden hose. This will keep the protective granules in tact. Keep in mind to protect your landscaping from bleach run off as well.



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